WILLIAM ISAAC’S PUBLISHED WORK

Bill Isaac has authored hundreds of articles in top publications and has frequently testified before Congress.

RECENT PUBLISHED WORK

columns from William Isaac in top financial publications

ISAAC: Deregulation gone awry

ISAAC: Deregulation gone awry

April 11, 2011

Repealing Dodd-Frank without a substitute would be counterproductive
as published in the Washington Times

Eighteen Republican senators recently introduced a bill to repeal the Dodd-Frank financial “reform” legislation. I whole-heartedly support repeal, but repealing Dodd-Frank without delivering a serious alternative would be both a political and a policy mistake of the first order.

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FDIC Isaac Remarks at Roundtable on Brokered Deposits

FDIC Isaac Remarks at Roundtable on Brokered Deposits

March 18, 2011

During my tenure as Chairman of the FDIC, the practice of money brokers bundling vast sums of money from investors and placing those funds in high-risk banks and S&Ls paying the highest interest rates cost the FDIC and taxpayers tens of billions of dollars in losses.  The FDIC had a similar experience with brokered funds during the most recent crisis.  It was my honor to participate in an FDIC Roundtable on this subject on March 18, 2011.  The agenda of that Roundtable is below followed by my opening remarks.  After my remarks, I have included my testimony on the subject at four different Senate and House hearings during 1983 and 1985.  Thirty years after this problem surfaced, Congress has yet to deal effectively with this abuse of the deposit insurance system.

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Assessing the Boom in U.S. Farmland Prices

Assessing the Boom in U.S. Farmland Prices

March 10, 2011

REMARKS BY
WILLIAM M. ISAAC
FORMER CHAIRMAN
FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

BEFORE
A SYMPOSIUM HOSTED BY THE
FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
ASSESSING THE BOOM IN U.S. FARMLAND PRICES

March 10, 2011
Washington, DC

It’s a great pleasure to participate in today’s symposium assessing the developing boom in U.S. farmland prices.  I commend the FDIC not only for hosting today’s symposium but for continuously providing a wealth of information to the industry and public about trends in the economy and the financial services industry.

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ISAAC & HURLEY: Too safe to fail

ISAAC & HURLEY: Too safe to fail

March 4, 2011

Requiring big banks to build cash reserves can prevent future failures

By William M. Isaac and Cornelius Hurley – The Washington Times

The finance ministers of the Group of 20, meeting in Paris last weekend, signaled their intention to address the issue of too-big-to-fail (TBTF) financial firms at their next meeting. The Paris communique calls for “higher loss absorbency measures” and “levies” on systemically important financial institutions.

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Don’t Bet The Farm: Assessing the Boom in U.S. Farmland Prices

Don’t Bet The Farm: Assessing the Boom in U.S. Farmland Prices

February 21, 2011

Is a bubble developing in the agricultural sector that could lead to a collapse of the sector comparable to the very painful crash in the early to mid-1980s? The FDIC is sponsoring a symposium to explore that very issue and you are welcome to attend (see below).

Don’t Bet The Farm: Assessing the Boom in U.S. Farmland Prices
A Symposium Hosted by the FDIC on Thursday, March 10, 2011

L. William Seidman Center, 3501 Fairfax Drive, Arlington, Virginia

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Banks should be allowed to pay out dividends

Banks should be allowed to pay out dividends

February 9, 2011

published by the Financial Times

Nineteen of the largest US banks received taxpayer capital in 2008 under the troubled asset relief programme and were prohibited from paying dividends. Sixteen of the banks have now repaid Tarp. Most are eager to resume paying dividends and have asked permission to do so from the Federal Reserve.

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Bank Regulatory System Out of Balance

Bank Regulatory System Out of Balance

February 8, 2011

I recently came across the following article I had written for the American Banker just about five years ago to the day (in the heady boom year of 2006). The article describes how the regulatory system had gotten significantly weaker over the previous twenty years while the banks had grown far more powerful and complex. It’s an interesting read, particularly in view of the subsequent financial collapse followed by a toothless regulatory reform bill that fixed nothing of consequence.

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